Ramblings

I tend to ramble about completely different subjects.
I hope that you don't mind.
deviantArt · livejournal · pixiv · fanfiction · AMA  
~ Friday, August 1 ~
Permalink
hime1999:

I’m putting his picture here hoping that anyone would recognize him. The original picture was in sepia, so I took the liberty to colorize it according to his features. 
This is my grandfather, picture taken in the 50s before he got married to my grandmother. He was probably in his late 20s or early 30s then. He died more than a decade ago before any of his children and grandchildren know who he really was. His first wife, my grandmother, died 3 years before him and we don’t know any of his family nor relatives at all. 
This is what we know about him: 
He was half Dutch and half Javanese, born in the 1920s. His name was Hadi, probably not his birth name. He had light brown eyes, dark hair, light skin, and tall for contemporary men (about 170-180cm). 
He spoke Javanese, Indonesian, and Dutch fluently. He talked in Dutch with his first wife, a Javanese from Yogyakarta, but in Javanese with his children, grandchildren, and later wife. 
He was a Protestant who later in life converted to Islam. 
He had medical training. It was said that during WW2 and the subsequent Indonesian Independence war, he was a battlefield medic. After the war, he worked as a medic in Madiun, East Java, and got married to my grandmother, who was a midwive. Later, he quitted his medical career and became a househusband along with maintaining a reparation shop at home while his wife worked hospital shifts. 
I know this is like taking a random shot at the sky, but I was thinking that if Obama could look very much like his grandfather despite being different racially, then there is a possibility, no matter low, that his relatives, if there is any, could look like him. 
So could you guys do me a favor and reblog this post around for people to see? I know this is not really important compared to missing person posts and all, but all the same, I want to know if somewhere half across the world, I have a family that I never knew I had. 
If you have any news about someone who could be his relatives, please message me. My ask box is always open. 
Thank you for your time! 

hime1999:

I’m putting his picture here hoping that anyone would recognize him. The original picture was in sepia, so I took the liberty to colorize it according to his features. 

This is my grandfather, picture taken in the 50s before he got married to my grandmother. He was probably in his late 20s or early 30s then. He died more than a decade ago before any of his children and grandchildren know who he really was. His first wife, my grandmother, died 3 years before him and we don’t know any of his family nor relatives at all. 

This is what we know about him: 

  • He was half Dutch and half Javanese, born in the 1920s. His name was Hadi, probably not his birth name. He had light brown eyes, dark hair, light skin, and tall for contemporary men (about 170-180cm). 
  • He spoke Javanese, Indonesian, and Dutch fluently. He talked in Dutch with his first wife, a Javanese from Yogyakarta, but in Javanese with his children, grandchildren, and later wife. 
  • He was a Protestant who later in life converted to Islam. 
  • He had medical training. It was said that during WW2 and the subsequent Indonesian Independence war, he was a battlefield medic. After the war, he worked as a medic in Madiun, East Java, and got married to my grandmother, who was a midwive. Later, he quitted his medical career and became a househusband along with maintaining a reparation shop at home while his wife worked hospital shifts. 

I know this is like taking a random shot at the sky, but I was thinking that if Obama could look very much like his grandfather despite being different racially, then there is a possibility, no matter low, that his relatives, if there is any, could look like him. 

So could you guys do me a favor and reblog this post around for people to see? I know this is not really important compared to missing person posts and all, but all the same, I want to know if somewhere half across the world, I have a family that I never knew I had. 

If you have any news about someone who could be his relatives, please message me. My ask box is always open. 

Thank you for your time! 


57 notes
reblogged via hime1999
~ Monday, February 18 ~
Permalink
ikenbot:


Western Science and Traditional Knowledge: Despite Their Variations, Different Forms of Knowledge Can Learn From Each Other (Final)
First, a renewed approach to dialogue among cultures is required. Such a dialogue can only take place if there is a common principle shared by all participants. All humans from all cultural backgrounds have the same biological nature. At the same time, however, a dialogue is only possible because there is diversity at various levels. Eliminating these differences or staying in rigid isolation eliminates the conditions needed for a potentially mutually beneficial converse.
By acknowledging the uniqueness of each knowledge system, we can go well beyond a mere pluralist approach to knowledge. Dialogue can become a tool for social cohabitation, as well as for discovering and enhancing knowledge. It should be based on a sense of profound hospitality because it arises from different identities and traditions, which are interested in exchanging their perspectives and experiences. This should not be anathema to Western science—in fact, it is through dialogue that new insights have emerged from the ancient Greek academies to today’s laboratory meetings and scientific conferences. In this sense, a dialogue can catalyse the development of shared meanings, which are key factors in binding people and societies together as vehicles of social cohabitation (Bohm, 1996).
Dialogue can become a tool for social cohabitation, as well as for discovering and enhancing knowledge
The real world is too complex to be compressed into static conceptualizations. Dealing with this complexity requires approaches and strategies that maintain a continuous openness and willingness to discover and learn (Morin, 1990). This dialogue should take place with the unknown and the otherness. By shifting our perspective, and looking at other paths to knowledge that humans have developed and lived, we might create the necessary conditions for hitherto unknown knowledge to be revealed. All of these perspectives describe the human experience of reality. We need to open ourselves to participating in the experience of others, and yet we should also be aware that this opening can only start from where we already are—from our point of view or the tradition to which we belong. Our historical and culturally embedded perspective has been described by Gadamer as the “initial directedness of our whole ability to experience” (Gadamer, 1967). Nevertheless, from our delimited horizon we can still accept the invitation of other paths to knowledge and might well learn from them.
For example, some authors (Freeman, 1992; Iaccarino, 2003) have suggested that traditional knowledge systems can be helpful in dealing with complex systems: “The understanding of complex systems remains a major challenge for the future, and no scientist today can claim that we have at hand the appropriate methods with which to achieve this. Thus, we cannot discuss the future of science without taking into account the philosophical problems generated by the study of complexity. Modern, or Western, science may not be best suited to fulfil this task, as its view of the world is too constrained by its characteristic empirical and analytical approach that, in the past, made it so successful. We should therefore remember the contributions of other civilizations to the understanding of nature. […] Such traditional or indigenous knowledge is now increasingly being used not only with the aim of finding new drugs, but also to derive new concepts that may help us to reconcile empiricism and science” (Iaccarino, 2003).
There is little doubt that modern science can gain a lot from such a dialogue. It has been extremely efficient in studying specific aspects of the natural world—those that are achievable through observation and experimentation—but operates in an environment that is either strictly controlled, such as a laboratory, or highly simplified. This approach is crucial in order to make generalized claims about the validity of scientific propositions, because it allows hypotheses under the same or highly controlled conditions to be tested and verified.-However, an increasing number of critical voices argue that an approach based on reductionism—as helpful as it has been in the past—might no longer be sufficient to analyse and understand higher levels of complexity (Kellenberger, 2004; van Regenmortel, 2004). Moreover, scientists work only at specific levels of analysis. The theories formulated at each level are based on key observations, and, therefore, can explain only a specific set of facts (Iaccarino, 2003). Hence, the integration of methods and results from different approaches and levels of analysis can become essential.
These considerations seem to be particularly relevant for studying biological, ecological and social phenomena that include different levels of complexity. As already mentioned, the Western tradition of thinking is developing a different approach to gaining knowledge from complex systems, but it would be equally useful to learn how traditional approaches explain such complexity. Not only are they more holistic, but also they seem to be better suited to coping with the uncertainty and unpredictability that are viewed as intrinsic characteristics of natural systems. Western science and traditional knowledge constitute different paths to knowledge, but they are rooted in the same reality. We can only gain from paying attention to our cultural history and richness. — Fulvio Mazzocchi Institute for Atmospheric Pollution of CNR, Monterotondo, Italy

ikenbot:

Western Science and Traditional Knowledge: Despite Their Variations, Different Forms of Knowledge Can Learn From Each Other (Final)

First, a renewed approach to dialogue among cultures is required. Such a dialogue can only take place if there is a common principle shared by all participants. All humans from all cultural backgrounds have the same biological nature. At the same time, however, a dialogue is only possible because there is diversity at various levels. Eliminating these differences or staying in rigid isolation eliminates the conditions needed for a potentially mutually beneficial converse.

By acknowledging the uniqueness of each knowledge system, we can go well beyond a mere pluralist approach to knowledge. Dialogue can become a tool for social cohabitation, as well as for discovering and enhancing knowledge. It should be based on a sense of profound hospitality because it arises from different identities and traditions, which are interested in exchanging their perspectives and experiences. This should not be anathema to Western science—in fact, it is through dialogue that new insights have emerged from the ancient Greek academies to today’s laboratory meetings and scientific conferences. In this sense, a dialogue can catalyse the development of shared meanings, which are key factors in binding people and societies together as vehicles of social cohabitation (Bohm, 1996).

Dialogue can become a tool for social cohabitation, as well as for discovering and enhancing knowledge

The real world is too complex to be compressed into static conceptualizations. Dealing with this complexity requires approaches and strategies that maintain a continuous openness and willingness to discover and learn (Morin, 1990). This dialogue should take place with the unknown and the otherness. By shifting our perspective, and looking at other paths to knowledge that humans have developed and lived, we might create the necessary conditions for hitherto unknown knowledge to be revealed. All of these perspectives describe the human experience of reality. We need to open ourselves to participating in the experience of others, and yet we should also be aware that this opening can only start from where we already are—from our point of view or the tradition to which we belong. Our historical and culturally embedded perspective has been described by Gadamer as the “initial directedness of our whole ability to experience” (Gadamer, 1967). Nevertheless, from our delimited horizon we can still accept the invitation of other paths to knowledge and might well learn from them.

For example, some authors (Freeman, 1992; Iaccarino, 2003) have suggested that traditional knowledge systems can be helpful in dealing with complex systems: “The understanding of complex systems remains a major challenge for the future, and no scientist today can claim that we have at hand the appropriate methods with which to achieve this. Thus, we cannot discuss the future of science without taking into account the philosophical problems generated by the study of complexity. Modern, or Western, science may not be best suited to fulfil this task, as its view of the world is too constrained by its characteristic empirical and analytical approach that, in the past, made it so successful. We should therefore remember the contributions of other civilizations to the understanding of nature. […] Such traditional or indigenous knowledge is now increasingly being used not only with the aim of finding new drugs, but also to derive new concepts that may help us to reconcile empiricism and science” (Iaccarino, 2003).

There is little doubt that modern science can gain a lot from such a dialogue. It has been extremely efficient in studying specific aspects of the natural world—those that are achievable through observation and experimentation—but operates in an environment that is either strictly controlled, such as a laboratory, or highly simplified. This approach is crucial in order to make generalized claims about the validity of scientific propositions, because it allows hypotheses under the same or highly controlled conditions to be tested and verified.-However, an increasing number of critical voices argue that an approach based on reductionism—as helpful as it has been in the past—might no longer be sufficient to analyse and understand higher levels of complexity (Kellenberger, 2004; van Regenmortel, 2004). Moreover, scientists work only at specific levels of analysis. The theories formulated at each level are based on key observations, and, therefore, can explain only a specific set of facts (Iaccarino, 2003). Hence, the integration of methods and results from different approaches and levels of analysis can become essential.

These considerations seem to be particularly relevant for studying biological, ecological and social phenomena that include different levels of complexity. As already mentioned, the Western tradition of thinking is developing a different approach to gaining knowledge from complex systems, but it would be equally useful to learn how traditional approaches explain such complexity. Not only are they more holistic, but also they seem to be better suited to coping with the uncertainty and unpredictability that are viewed as intrinsic characteristics of natural systems. Western science and traditional knowledge constitute different paths to knowledge, but they are rooted in the same reality. We can only gain from paying attention to our cultural history and richness. — Fulvio Mazzocchi Institute for Atmospheric Pollution of CNR, Monterotondo, Italy

Tags: science
335 notes
reblogged via scinerds
~ Thursday, January 3 ~
Permalink
asianhistory:




Pictured: Tomoe Gozen legendary female warrior.


With their husbands in combat almost continuously, 16th century samurai women provided for the defense of their homes and children. Their wartime roles included washing and preparing the decapitated bloody heads of the enemy, which were presented to the victorious generals. Like their samurai husbands, personal honor was paramount for samurai women. They carried small daggers and were always prepared to die to maintain their honor and family name. After Tokugawa Ieyasu unified Japan, the role of women changed. Their samurai husbands, no longer fighting wars, had become bureaucrats. Women were now encouraged to supervise their children’s education and manage the home. Travel was highly restricted for samurai women during the years of the Tokugawa Shogunate. Forbidden from traveling alone, they were required to carry travel permits, and were usually accompanied by a man. Samurai women often were harassed by the authorities when passing through the government inspection posts. — PBS, Japan

I just discovered the existence of onna-bugeisha (女武芸者). うおおお

asianhistory:

Pictured: Tomoe Gozen legendary female warrior.

With their husbands in combat almost continuously, 16th century samurai women provided for the defense of their homes and children. Their wartime roles included washing and preparing the decapitated bloody heads of the enemy, which were presented to the victorious generals. Like their samurai husbands, personal honor was paramount for samurai women. They carried small daggers and were always prepared to die to maintain their honor and family name. 

After Tokugawa Ieyasu unified Japan, the role of women changed. Their samurai husbands, no longer fighting wars, had become bureaucrats. Women were now encouraged to supervise their children’s education and manage the home. 

Travel was highly restricted for samurai women during the years of the Tokugawa Shogunate. Forbidden from traveling alone, they were required to carry travel permits, and were usually accompanied by a man. Samurai women often were harassed by the authorities when passing through the government inspection posts. 
PBS, Japan

I just discovered the existence of onna-bugeisha (女武芸者). うおおお

Tags: japan history feminism
194 notes
reblogged via asianhistory
~ Tuesday, October 30 ~
Permalink

jtotheizzoe:

The Known Universe/The Amazing Journey

The American Museum of Natural History takes you on a trip from the here and the now, to a time and place beyond the distant edge of the universe, a view existing only in the eye of the mind of a single species on a speck of illuminated dust playing the role of anchor in this cosmic journey of scale.

This is a four-dimensional experience, and your soundtrack is Hans Zimmer, remixed. This journey through time and space is best experienced in full-screen 1080p and with those headphones cranked.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I’ll be in the corner with my happy science tears.

(fantastic work by stormeindustries)


236 notes
reblogged via jtotheizzoe
~ Sunday, October 28 ~
Permalink
seventypercentethanol:

Bai Su Zhen and Xu Xian

The Lady White Snake, Bai Su Zhen, and the Scholar, Xu Xian loved each other deeply. All was well until the monk, Fa Hai, tried to separate them.
Bai Su Zhen remained defiant; “What right have you, to separate two souls in love?”
To which the monk replied, “By the laws of nature, and heaven’s edict.” So saying, he sealed her away in the Lei Feng Pagoda.

For the Traversing Realms print compliation. I chose to illustrate a folktale which, for obvious reasons, means a lot to me. Prints are available online through the link.

seventypercentethanol:

Bai Su Zhen and Xu Xian

The Lady White Snake, Bai Su Zhen, and the Scholar, Xu Xian loved each other deeply. All was well until the monk, Fa Hai, tried to separate them.

Bai Su Zhen remained defiant; “What right have you, to separate two souls in love?”

To which the monk replied, “By the laws of nature, and heaven’s edict.” So saying, he sealed her away in the Lei Feng Pagoda.

For the Traversing Realms print compliation. I chose to illustrate a folktale which, for obvious reasons, means a lot to me. Prints are available online through the link.

Tags: chinese folktales art
6,401 notes
reblogged via seventypercentethanol
~ Tuesday, October 9 ~
Permalink Tags: science feminism
480 notes
reblogged via jtotheizzoe
Permalink
tatewaki2011:

毎度日本語ですみませぬ…
どなたか訳して下さっ…

少し時間があるので訳してみます・・・Maaf翻訳全然サボっててすみません。
大学とアルバイトで時間が・・・っ orz
Warning: Translating directly to and from Japanese is difficult. Some liberties taken - if you have a better suggestion, don’t feel shy about letting me know. Also, the names of the Portuguese holidays are taken from here.
First panel:
As the Iberian peninsula is engulfed in protests against the austerity measure, Portugal decided to significantly decrease holidays starting next year.
(Holidays are reduced from twelve to eight days:
10/5: Republic Day
12/1: Restoration of Independence
8/15: Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary into Heaven
The sixtieth day from Easter Sunday, Corpus Christi)
October 5th, the country’s National Day or the Anniversary of the Establishment of Republicanism, also became a target of this measure.
Panel 2:
It is unknown if this holiday will be celebrated after next year, but this year’s celebration meets its last as “the ceremony as a holiday” for the time being.
Portugal: *Sigh* I wonder if everybody will remember … No, no, I don’t have time for feeling down! In the worst case, [this holiday] will be its last, so I have to get myself together!
Secretary-ish person: Mr. Portugal!
Panel 3:
Secretay-ish person: The Prime Minister has used foreign travels as an excuse to cancel at the last minute.
Portugal (mentally): That bastard———!
Portugal (aloud): I see …
Therefore, the citizens also have cancelled the ceremony as a protest to this policy.

tatewaki2011:

毎度日本語ですみませぬ…

どなたか訳して下さっ…

少し時間があるので訳してみます・・・Maaf翻訳全然サボっててすみません。

大学とアルバイトで時間が・・・っ orz

Warning: Translating directly to and from Japanese is difficult. Some liberties taken - if you have a better suggestion, don’t feel shy about letting me know. Also, the names of the Portuguese holidays are taken from here.

First panel:

As the Iberian peninsula is engulfed in protests against the austerity measure, Portugal decided to significantly decrease holidays starting next year.

(Holidays are reduced from twelve to eight days:

  • 10/5: Republic Day
  • 12/1: Restoration of Independence
  • 8/15: Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary into Heaven
  • The sixtieth day from Easter Sunday, Corpus Christi)

October 5th, the country’s National Day or the Anniversary of the Establishment of Republicanism, also became a target of this measure.

Panel 2:

It is unknown if this holiday will be celebrated after next year, but this year’s celebration meets its last as “the ceremony as a holiday” for the time being.

Portugal: *Sigh* I wonder if everybody will remember … No, no, I don’t have time for feeling down! In the worst case, [this holiday] will be its last, so I have to get myself together!

Secretary-ish person: Mr. Portugal!

Panel 3:

Secretay-ish person: The Prime Minister has used foreign travels as an excuse to cancel at the last minute.

Portugal (mentally): That bastard———!

Portugal (aloud): I see …

Therefore, the citizens also have cancelled the ceremony as a protest to this policy.

Tags: hetalia news
56 notes
reblogged via tatewaki2011
~ Thursday, October 4 ~
Permalink Tags: science biology ecology tcp computer
129 notes
reblogged via obscureref
Permalink
tatewaki2011:

1143 and 1910

tatewaki2011:

1143 and 1910

Tags: portugal hetalia
92 notes
reblogged via tatewaki2011
~ Wednesday, October 3 ~
Permalink
mothernaturenetwork:

Many low IQs are the result of bad gene luckScientists have discovered that many cases of low IQ or mental retardation result from random new mutations that arise spontaneously, not from faulty genes inherited from parents.

mothernaturenetwork:

Many low IQs are the result of bad gene luck
Scientists have discovered that many cases of low IQ or mental retardation result from random new mutations that arise spontaneously, not from faulty genes inherited from parents.

Tags: genes iq science
159 notes
reblogged via scinerds
~ Tuesday, September 25 ~
Permalink
jtotheizzoe:

Hubble Goes Back In Tiiiiiime
If I may: Some recommended listening to accompany this post.
Over the course of 50 days, and a total exposure time of 2 million seconds, the Hubble Space Telescope captured the above image. This eXtreme Deep Field (XDF) view is like visual time travel, revealing galaxies so distant that the light that made the image was released 13.2 BILLION years ago.
That was only about 500 million years after the Big Bang! This image only contains about 5,500 galaxies because its field of view was so much smaller, and many of them are very young in this image. This means that we can use it to gain clues to how things were churning and forming in the Olde Days of the Universe.
I stared at this for several minutes, and was awed by two thoughts: How many of these don’t even exist anymore? How many stars just like ours are inside of each one?
Tour a hi-res image here, and share in the wow.
(via HubbleSite)

jtotheizzoe:

Hubble Goes Back In Tiiiiiime

If I may: Some recommended listening to accompany this post.

Over the course of 50 days, and a total exposure time of 2 million seconds, the Hubble Space Telescope captured the above image. This eXtreme Deep Field (XDF) view is like visual time travel, revealing galaxies so distant that the light that made the image was released 13.2 BILLION years ago.

That was only about 500 million years after the Big Bang! This image only contains about 5,500 galaxies because its field of view was so much smaller, and many of them are very young in this image. This means that we can use it to gain clues to how things were churning and forming in the Olde Days of the Universe.

I stared at this for several minutes, and was awed by two thoughts: How many of these don’t even exist anymore? How many stars just like ours are inside of each one?

Tour a hi-res image here, and share in the wow.

(via HubbleSite)


1,472 notes
reblogged via jtotheizzoe
~ Saturday, September 22 ~
Permalink

jtotheizzoe:

A fascinating look inside the most common objects.

prostheticknowledge:

Inside Insides 

Creative blog uses MRI scanner to look into objects such as vegetables, often with pleasurable results. These captures into animated gifs (as you can see above).

You can check out more at the blog here

[Note - I am not responsible for the above Gifs - they were made by Andy Ellison who runs the blog - the only alteration I have made of them is to optimize and reduce the original file sizes so they can run here. Higher resolution versions can be found at the blog itself]

Tags: science mri
2,215 notes
reblogged via jtotheizzoe
~ Thursday, September 20 ~
Permalink

explore-blog:

How to confuse a moral compass – in an ingenious experiment, Swedish researchers demonstrate the psychology of “choice blindness,” getting people to defend choices they didn’t actually make.

( It’s Okay To Be Smart)

(Source: )


134 notes
reblogged via scinerds
~ Thursday, September 13 ~
Permalink
fyeaheasterneurope:

Heidoru (St. Petersberg), Capital of Russia, by Japanese artist Utagawa Yoshitora in 1865.
(Source.)
You can click on the image to embiggen, but I like these ladies so much that I took a screenshot of a closeup of just one portion of the picture.

fyeaheasterneurope:

Heidoru (St. Petersberg), Capital of Russia, by Japanese artist Utagawa Yoshitora in 1865.

(Source.)

You can click on the image to embiggen, but I like these ladies so much that I took a screenshot of a closeup of just one portion of the picture.

Tags: russia japan
69 notes
reblogged via fyeaheasterneurope
~ Wednesday, September 12 ~
Permalink

jtotheizzoe:

Acoustic Levitation of Liquids? What Wizardry Be This?

High-frequency acoustic signals interfere to create a standing wave, allowing liquids to “levitate” at the nodes, where the two acoustic forces cancel out each other and gravity.

In other words, whoa.

(via PsiVid)

Tags: science standing waves waves physics engineering
1,341 notes
reblogged via scinerds